Uncategorized

The Avoidable Crisis: German Sources

1 Ruhm, Emily and Leif Erik Rehder. “Germany: Retail Foods,” USDA: Global Agricultural Information Network, August 2017, https://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_Berlin_Germany_8-7-2017.pdf.

2 von Witzke, Harald et al., “Meat Eats Land,” World Wildlife Fund Germany, September 2011, http://www.wwf.de/fileadmin/fm-wwf/Publikationen-PDF/Meat_eats_land.pdf.

3 “The Growth of Soy: Impacts & Solutions,” World Wildlife Fund International, January 2014, http://wwf.pand a.org/what_ we_do/footprint/agriculture/soy/soyreport/.

4 Ruhm, Emily and Leif Erik Rehder. “Germany: Retail Foods,” USDA: Global Agricultural Information Network, August 2017,  https://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_Berlin_Germany_8-7-2017.pdf.

5 “All countries exporting Soybeans to Germany, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&importer =276&category=87&units=weight. ; “All countries exporting Soybeans to Germany, in 2015 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2015, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2015& importer=276&category=87 &units=weight.

6 Ruhm, Emily and Leif Erik Rehder. “Germany: Retail Foods,” USDA: Global Agricultural Information Network, August 2017, https://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Retail%20Foods_Berlin_Germany_8-7-2017.pdf.

7 Average numbers based on the imports for the past decade (2007-2016) based on the numbers from the following data base: “South America exporting Soybeans to Germany, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&exporter=sac&importe r=276&category=87&units=weight.

8 Lomeli, Luciana Gallardo and James Anderson. “Restoring Degraded Land in Latin America Can Bring Billions in Economic Benefits,” World Resources Institute, October 2016, http://www.wri.org/blog/2016/10/restoring-degraded-land-latin-america-can-bring-billions-economic-benefits.

9 Lomeli, Luciana Gallardo and James Anderson. “Restoring Degraded Land in Latin America Can Bring Billions in Economic Benefits,” World Resources Institute, October 2016, http://www.wri.org/blog/2016/10/restoring-degraded-land-latin-america-can-bring-billions-economic-benefits.

10 Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol 45, pp. 24-24, July 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964.

11 Keith, Slack. “The Indigenous of the Paraguayan Chaco: Struggle for the Land,” Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, December 1995, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/indigenous-paraguayan-chaco-struggle-land. ; Greene, Caitlyn. “Beyond the Amazon: Deforestation in Argentina,” The Argentina Independent, September 2018, http://www.argentinaindependent.com/socialissues/environ ment/beyond-the-amazon-deforestation-in-argentina/.

12 Lovera, Miguel et al. “La Situación de los Ayoreo Aislados en Bolivia y en las Zonas Transfronterizas con Paraquay,” Iniciativa Amotocodie, 2016, http://www.iniciativa-amotocodie.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/InformeAaisladosZonaFronteraPY-BO-Reduced.pdf.

13 de Waroux, Yann le Polain et al. “Land-use policies and corporate investments in agriculture in the Gran Chaco and Chiquitano,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 113(15), April 2016, http://www.pnas.org/content/113/15/4021.full.

14 Zak, Marcelo R. et al. “What Drives Accelerated Land Cover Change in Central Argentina? Synergistic Consequences of Climatic, Socioeconomic and Technological Factors,” Springer Science + Business Media, LLC , Vol. 42(2) pp. 181-189, August 2008, https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00267-008-9101-y.

15 Baumann, Matthias. “Land-Use Competition in the South American Chaco,” Springer International Publishing Switzerland, July 2016, https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2_13.  

16  Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol. 45, pp. 24-34, July 2017, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964?_escaped_fragment_=#!.  

17 Baumann, Matthias et al. “Carbon emissions from agricultural expansion and intensification in the Chaco,” Global Change Biology, Vol. 23(5), pp. 1902-1916, October 2016, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ 10.1111/gcb.13521/abstract.

18 “Each Country’s Share of CO2 Emissions,” Union of Concerned Scientists: Science for a healthy planet and safer world, n.d. https://www.ucsusa.org/global-warming/science-and-impacts/science/each-countrys-share-of-co2.html#.WniuxZOpnBJ.

19 “Tree cover loss,” Global Forest Watch Commodities, n.d. http://commodities.globalforestwatch.org/#v=map& lyrs=tcc%2ChansenLoss&x=-60.69&y=-23.5&l=5. ; “Argentina ranks ninth in infamous ‘deforestation list,” Buenos Aires Herald, http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/198242/argentina-ranks-ninth-in-infamous-%E2%80%98deforesta.

20 “Deforestatión en el norte de Argentina,” Greenpeace Argentina, January 2017,  http://www.greenpeace.org/a rgentina/Global/argentina/2017/1/Deforestacion-norte-Argentina-Anual-2016.pdf.

21 “Aplicación del “Fondo Nacional para el Enriquecimiento y la Conservación de los Bosques Nativos” establecido per la Ley 26.331,” Greenpeace Argentina, November 2010,   https://www.greenpeace.org/argentina/Global /argentina/report/2010/Bosques/Ley_Bosques/aplicacion-ley-de-bosques-fondos.pdf.

22 Guidi, Ruxandra. “Seven million hectares of forests have been lost in Argentina over the past 20 years,” Mongabay, February 2016,  https://news.mongabay.com/2016/02/seven-million-hectares-of-forests-have-been-lost-in-argentina-in-the-past-20-years/.

23 “Deforestation in the Chaco spikes in the wake of “illegal” presidential decree stripping back environmental safeguards,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/deforestation-in-the-chaco-spikes-in-the-wake-of-illegal-presidential-decree-stripping-back-environmental-safeguards/.

24  Riveros, Fernando. “The Gran Chaco,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, July 2012,  http://archive.today/2012.07.30-004747/http://www.fao.org/ag/A GP/agpc/doc/Bulletin/GranChaco.htm.

25 Semper-Pascual, Asunción et al. “Mapping extinction debt highlights conservation opportunities for birds and mammals in the South American Chaco,” Journal of Applied Ecology, January 2018, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.13074/full.

26 “Protecting the Atlantic Forest in Paraguay,” World Land Trust, n.d., http://www.worldlandtrust.org/projects/paraguay/guyra-reta-reserve.

27 Law No. 5.045/13

28 “Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

29 “Argentina plans railways to expand agriculture in north,” The Western Producer, April 2017,  https://www.producer.com/2017/04/argentina-plans-railways-to-expand-agriculture-in-north/. ; “Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

30 “Argentina – Soy,” Trase.Earth, 2016, https://goo.gl/SSaoT6.

31 “Argentina – Soy,” Trase.Earth, 2016, https://goo.gl/SSaoT6.

32 “South America exporting Soybeans to Europe, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016,  https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&exporter=sac&importer=eur& category=87&units=weight.

33 Mooney, Pat et al. “Too Big to Feed,” International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems, October 2017, http://www.ipesfood.org/images/Reports/Concentration_FullReport.pdf.

34 Murphy, Sophia et al. “Cereal Secrets: The world’s largest grain traders and global agriculture,” Oxfam Research Reports, August 2012, https://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/rr-cereal-secrets-grain-traders-agriculture-30082012-en.pdf.

35 “Instalaciones: Acopios,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bungeargentina.com/es/instalaciones/acopios.

36 “Zero Deforestation: Building 21st century value chains,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bunge.com/sustainability/zero-deforestation.  ; “Ending Deforestation: Cargill is committed to protecting forests and ensuring deforestation-free supply chains,” Cargill, n.d. https://www.cargill.com/sustainability/deforestation.

37 Bellantonio, Marisa et al. “The Ultimate Mystery Meat,” Mighty Earth, February 2017, https://www.mightyearth.org/mysterymeat/.

38 “Ministry confirms illegality of deforestation in farms owned by politically-connected businessman in Argentina,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/argentinas-government-confirms-illegality-of-deforestation-in-farms-owned-by-politically-connected-businessman/.

39  “Argentina: Country Environmental Analysis,” World Bank Group, May 2016, http://documentos.bancomundial.org/curated/es/218361479799045279/pdf/109527-ENGLISH-PUBLIC-ARG-CEA-Country-Environmental-Analysis-English.pdf.

40 Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017, https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/. ; Cressey, Daniel. “Widely Used Herbicide Linked to Cancer,” Scientific American, March 2015, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/.

41 “Macrons says glyphosate to be banned in France within three years,” Reuters, November 2017,  https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-health-glyphosate-macron/macron-says-glyphosate-to-be-banned-in-france-within-three-years-idUSKBN1DR259.

42 Kalverkamp, Michael Álvarez et al. “Meat Atlas: Facts and figures about the animals we eat,” Heinrich Böll Stiftung, January 2014, https://www.boell.de/sites/default/files/meat_atlas2014_kommentierbar.pdf.

43 Ueker, Marly Elaine et al. “Parenteral exposure to pesticides and occurrence of congenital malformations: hospital-based case-control stody,” BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 16(125), August 2016, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4983026/. ;  Ruderman, L et al. “Análisis de la Salud Colectiva Ambiental de Malvinas Argentina-Córdoba Una investigación socio- ambiental y sanitaria a través de técnicas cualitativas y relevamiento epidemiológico cuantitativo,” Reduas, August 2012, http://www.reduas.com.ar/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/02/Informe-Malvinas-corregido1.pdf.

44 This interview was conducted in the indigenous language Guarani and was later translated into English.

45 This interview was conducted in the indigenous language Guarani, and was later translated into English.

46 “Ley Nº 904/81,” Estuato do las Comunidades Indíegenas, n.d.  http://www.tierraviva.org.py/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/PDF.pdf.

47 Paraguayan Law no. 904/81, article 17.

48 Tyrrell, Kelly April. “Study shows Brazil’s Soy Moratorium still needed to preserve the Amazon,” University of Wisconsin-Madison, January 2015,  https://news.wisc.edu/study-shows-brazils-soy-moratorium-still-needed-to-preserve-amazon/.

49  “Companies pledging to tackle soy and cattle driven deforestation in Brazil’s Cerrado nearly triples in just three months,” Tropical Forest Alliance 2020, January 2018, https://www.tfa2020.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Press-release-marking-the-significant-increase-in-company-signatories-to-the-Cerrado-Manifesto-Statement-of-Support-25-Jan-2018.pdf

50 “South America exporting Soybeans to Germany, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016,  https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&exporter=sac&importer=276& category=87&units=weight.

51 “Glyphosate,” European Commission, n.d. https://ec.europa.eu/food/plant/pesticides/glyphosate_en; https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/. ; Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017,  https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/.

52 Pritchard, Janet. “Developing EU measures to address forest-risk commodities: What can be learned from EU regulation of other sectors?,” Fern, November 2016, http://www.fern.org/sites/fern.org/files/Developing %20EU%20measures_0.pdf.

53 “Agriculture and deforestation,” Fern, April 2017, http://www.fern.org/capreform.

 


The Avoidable Crisis: French Sources

1 “All countries exporting Soybeans to France, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&importer=251&category=87&uni ts=weight.

2  Cette estimation se fonde sur les importations de la dernière décennie (2007-2016), d'après les chiffres figurant dans la base de données suivante: “All countries exporting Soybeans to Germany by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2007-2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/datayear=2007&exporter=sac&importer=251&category=87&units=weight.

3 Lomeli, Luciana Gallardo and James Anderson. “Restoring Degraded Land in Latin America Can Bring Billions in Economic Benefits,” World Resources Institute, October 2016, http://www.wri.org/blog/2016/10/restoring-degraded-land-latin-america-can-bring-billions-economic-benefits.

4 Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol. 45, pp. 24-34, July 2017, http://www.sciencedirect.c om/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964?_escaped_fragment_=#!.

5 Keith, Slack. “The Indigenous of the Paraguayan Chaco: Struggle for the Land,” Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, December 1995, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/indigenous-paraguayan-chaco-struggle-land. ; Greene, Caitlyn. “Beyond the Amazon: Deforestation in Argentina,” The Argentina Independent, September 2018, http://www.argentinaindependent.com/socialissues/environ ment/beyond-the-amazon-deforestation-in-argentina/.

6 Lovera, Miguel et al. “La Situación de los Ayoreo Aislados en Bolivia y en las Zonas Transfronterizas con Paraquay,” Iniciativa Amotocodie, 2016, http://www.iniciativa-amotocodie.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/InformeAaisladosZonaFronteraPY-BO-Reduced.pdf.

7 de Waroux, Yann le Polain et al. “Land-use policies and corporate investments in agriculture in the Gran Chaco and Chiquitano,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 113(15), April 2016, http://www.pnas.org/content/113/15/4021.full.

8 Zak, Marcelo R. et al. “What Drives Accelerated Land Cover Change in Central Argentina? Synergistic Consequences of Climatic, Socioeconomic and Technological Factors,” Springer Science + Business Media, LLC , Vol. 42(2) pp. 181-189, August 2008, https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00267-008-9101-y.

9 Baumann, Matthias. “Land-Use Competition in the South American Chaco,” Springer International Publishing Switzerland, July 2016, https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2_13.  

10  Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol. 45, pp. 24-34, July 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964 

11 Baumann, Matthias et al. “Carbon emissions from agricultural expansion and intensification in the Chaco,” Global Change Biology, Vol. 23(5), pp. 1902-1916, October 2016, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ 10.1111/gcb.13521/abstract.

12 “Each Country’s Share of CO2 Emissions,” Union of Concerned Scientists: Science for a healthy planet and safer world, n.d. https://www.ucsusa.org/global-warming/science-and-impacts/science/each-countrys-share-of-co2.html#.WniuxZOpnBJ.

13 “Tree cover loss,” Global Forest Watch Commodities, n.d. http://commodities.globalforestwatch.org/#v=map& lyrs=tcc%2ChansenLoss&x=-60.69&y=-23.5&l=5. ; “Argentina ranks ninth in infamous ‘deforestation list,” Buenos Aires Herald, http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/198242/argentina-ranks-ninth-in-infamous-%E2%80%98deforesta.

14 “Deforestatión en el norte de Argentina,” Greenpeace Argentina, January 2017,  http://www.greenpeace.org/a rgentina/Global/argentina/2017/1/Deforestacion-norte-Argentina-Anual-2016.pdf 

15 “Aplicación del “Fondo Nacional para el Enriquecimiento y la Conservación de los Bosques Nativos” establecido per la Ley 26.331,” Greenpeace Argentina, November 2010,   https://www.greenpeace.org/argentina/Global /argentina/report/2010/Bosques/Ley_Bosques/aplicacion-ley-de-bosques-fondos.pdf.

16 Guidi, Ruxandra. “Seven million hectares of forests have been lost in Argentina over the past 20 years,” Mongabay, February 2016,  https://news.mongabay.com/2016/02/seven-million-hectares-of-forests-have-been-lost-in-argentina-in-the-past-20-years/.

17 “Deforestation in the Chaco spikes in the wake of “illegal” presidential decree stripping back environmental safeguards,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/deforestation-in-the-chaco-spikes-in-the-wake-of-illegal-presidential-decree-stripping-back-environmental-safeguards/.

18 Riveros, Fernando. “The Gran Chaco,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, July 2012,  http://archive.today/2012.07.30-004747/http://www.fao.org/ag/AGP/agpc/doc/Bulletin/GranChaco.htm 

19 Semper-Pascual, Asunción et al. “Mapping extinction debt highlights conservation opportunities for birds and mammals in the South American Chaco,” Journal of Applied Ecology, January 2018, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.13074/full.

20 “Protecting the Atlantic Forest in Paraguay,” World Land Trust, n.d., http://www.worldlandtrust.org/projects/paraguay/guyra-reta-reserve.

21 Law No. 5.045/13

22 “Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

23 “Argentina plans railways to expand agriculture in north,” The Western Producer, April 2017,  https://www.producer.com/2017/04/argentina-plans-railways-to-expand-agriculture-in-north/.“Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

24 “All countries exporting Soybeans to Europe, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&importer=251&category=87&uni ts=weight.

25 Mooney, Pat et al. “Too Big to Feed,” International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems, October 2017, http://www.ipesfood.org/images/Reports/Concentration_FullReport.pdf.

26 “Instalaciones: Acopios,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bungeargentina.com/es/instalaciones/acopios.

27 “Zero Deforestation: Building 21st century value chains,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bunge.com/sustainability/zero-deforestation.  ; “Ending Deforestation: Cargill is committed to protecting forests and ensuring deforestation-free supply chains,” Cargill, n.d. https://www.cargill.com/sustainability/deforestation.

28 Bellantonio, Marisa et al. “The Ultimate Mystery Meat,” Mighty Earth, February 2017, https://www.mightyearth.org/mysterymeat/.

29 “Ministry confirms illegality of deforestation in farms owned by politically-connected businessman in Argentina,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/argentinas-government-confirms-illegality-of-deforestation-in-farms-owned-by-politically-connected-businessman/.

30  “Argentina: Country Environmental Analysis,” World Bank Group, May 2016, http://documentos.bancomundial.org/curated/es/218361479799045279/pdf/109527-ENGLISH-PUBLIC-ARG-CEA-Country-Environmental-Analysis-English.pdf.

31 Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017, https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/. ; Cressey, Daniel. “Widely Used Herbicide Linked to Cancer,” Scientific American, March 2015, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/.

32 Kalverkamp, Michael Álvarez et al. “Meat Atlas: Facts and figures about the animals we eat,” Heinrich Böll Stiftung, January 2014, https://www.boell.de/sites/default/files/meat_atlas2014_kommentierbar.pdf.

33 Ueker, Marly Elaine et al. “Parenteral exposure to pesticides and occurrence of congenital malformations: hospital-based case-control stody,” BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 16(125), August 2016, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4983026/. ;  Ruderman, L et al. “Análisis de la Salud Colectiva Ambiental de Malvinas Argentina-Córdoba Una investigación socio- ambiental y sanitaria a través de técnicas cualitativas y relevamiento epidemiológico cuantitativo,” Reduas, August 2012, http://www.reduas.com.ar/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/02/Informe-Malvinas-corregido1.pdf.

34 Cet entretien a été mené en langue Guarani, puis traduit en anglais

35 Cet entretien a été mené en langue Guarani puis traduit en anglais

36 “Ley Nº 904/81,” Estuato do las Comunidades Indíegenas, n.d.  http://www.tierraviva.org.py/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/PDF.pdf.

37 Loi paraguayenne N°. 904/81, article 17.

38  “Companies pledging to tackle soy and cattle driven deforestation in Brazil’s Cerrado nearly triples in just three months,” Tropical Forest Alliance 2020, January 2018, https://www.tfa2020.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Press-release-marking-the-significant-increase-in-company-signatories-to-the-Cerrado-Manifesto-Statement-of-Support-25-Jan-2018.pdf

39 “All countries exporting Soybeans to France, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&importer=251&category=87&uni ts=weight.

40 “Glyphosate,” European Commission, n.d. https://ec.europa.eu/food/plant/pesticides/glyphosate_en; https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/. ; Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017,  https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/.

41 Flach, Bob et al. “EU Biofuels Annual 2017,” USDA: Global Agricultural Information Network, June 2017, https://gain.fas.usda.gov/Recent%20GAIN%20Publications/Biofuels%20Annual_The%20Hague_EU-28_6-19-2017.pdf.

42 Pritchard, Janet. “Developing EU measures to address forest-risk commodities: What can be learned from EU regulation of other sectors?,” Fern, November 2016, http://www.fern.org/sites/fern.org/files/Developing %20EU%20measures_0.pdf.

43 “Agriculture and deforestation,” Fern, April 2017, http://www.fern.org/capreform.


The Avoidable Crisis: EU Sources

1 “Meat Consumption,” Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Data, 2018, https://data.oecd.org/agroutput/meat-consumption.htm.

2 “The Growth of Soy: Impacts & Solutions,” World Wildlife Fund International, January 2014, http://wwf.pana.org/what_ we_do/footprint/agriculture/soy/soyreport/.

3 “Soja Barometer,” Dutch Soy Coalition, April 2014, http://soycoalition.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Soja-Barometer2014_UK_FINAL2.pdf. 

4 “All countries exporting Soybeans to Europe, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016 https://resourcetrade.earth/datayear=2016&importer= eur&category=87&units=weight.

5 “Agricultural commodity consumption in the EU – Policy Brief,” Fern,  May 2017, http://www.fern.org/sites/fern.org/files/Soybean%20briefing%20paper%204pp%20A4%20WEB%281%2.pdf.

6  “Data & Trends: EU Food and Drink Industry,” FoodDrink Europe, October 2017, http://www.fooddrinkeurope.eu/uploads/publications_documents/DataandTrends_Report_2017.pdf.

7 Average numbers based on the imports for the past decade (2007-2016) based on the numbers from the following data base: “All countries exporting Soybeans to Europe by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2007-2016, https://resourcetrade.earth/datayear=2007&exporter=sac&importer=251&category=87&units=weight.

8 Lomeli, Luciana Gallardo and James Anderson. “Restoring Degraded Land in Latin America Can Bring Billions in Economic Benefits,” World Resources Institute, October 2016, http://www.wri.org/blog/2016/10/restoring-degraded-land-latin-america-can-bring-billions-economic-benefits.

9 Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol 45, pp. 24-24, July 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964. 

10 Keith, Slack. “The Indigenous of the Paraguayan Chaco: Struggle for the Land,” Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine, December 1995, https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/indigenous-paraguayan-chaco-struggle-land. ; Greene, Caitlyn. “Beyond the Amazon: Deforestation in Argentina,” The Argentina Independent, September 2018, http://www.argentinaindependent.com/socialissues/environ ment/beyond-the-amazon-deforestation-in-argentina/.

11 Lovera, Miguel et al. “La Situación de los Ayoreo Aislados en Bolivia y en las Zonas Transfronterizas con Paraquay,” Iniciativa Amotocodie, 2016, http://www.iniciativa-amotocodie.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/InformeAaisladosZonaFronteraPY-BO-Reduced.pdf.

12 de Waroux, Yann le Polain et al. “Land-use policies and corporate investments in agriculture in the Gran Chaco and Chiquitano,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 113(15), April 2016, http://www.pnas.org/content/113/15/4021.full.

13 Zak, Marcelo R. et al. “What Drives Accelerated Land Cover Change in Central Argentina? Synergistic Consequences of Climatic, Socioeconomic and Technological Factors,” Springer Science + Business Media, LLC , Vol. 42(2) pp. 181-189, August 2008, https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00267-008-9101-y.

14 Baumann, Matthias. “Land-Use Competition in the South American Chaco,” Springer International Publishing Switzerland, July 2016, https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-33628-2_13.

15  Fehlenberg, Verena et al. “The role of soybean production as an underlying driver of deforestation in the South American Chaco,” Global Environmental Change, Vol. 45, pp. 24-34, July 2017, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378017305964.

16 Baumann, Matthias et al. “Carbon emissions from agricultural expansion and intensification in the Chaco,” Global Change Biology, Vol. 23(5), pp. 1902-1916, October 2016, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ 10.1111/gcb.13521/abstract.

17 “Each Country’s Share of CO2 Emissions,” Union of Concerned Scientists: Science for a healthy planet and safer world, n.d. https://www.ucsusa.org/global-warming/science-and-impacts/science/each-countrys-share-of-co2.html#.WniuxZOpnBJ.

18 “Tree cover loss,” Global Forest Watch Commodities, n.d. http://commodities.globalforestwatch.org/#v=map& lyrs=tcc%2ChansenLoss&x=-60.69&y=-23.5&l=5. ; “Argentina ranks ninth in infamous ‘deforestation list,” Buenos Aires Herald, http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/198242/argentina-ranks-ninth-in-infamous-%E2%80%98deforesta.

19 “Deforestatión en el norte de Argentina,” Greenpeace Argentina, January 2017,  http://www.greenpeace.org/a rgentina/Global/argentina/2017/1/Deforestacion-norte-Argentina-Anual-2016.pdf.

20 “Aplicación del “Fondo Nacional para el Enriquecimiento y la Conservación de los Bosques Nativos” establecido per la Ley 26.331,” Greenpeace Argentina, November 2010,   https://www.greenpeace.org/argentina/Global /argentina/report/2010/Bosques/Ley_Bosques/aplicacion-ley-de-bosques-fondos.pdf.

21 Guidi, Ruxandra. “Seven million hectares of forests have been lost in Argentina over the past 20 years,” Mongabay, February 2016,  https://news.mongabay.com/2016/02/seven-million-hectares-of-forests-have-been-lost-in-argentina-in-the-past-20-years/.

22 “Deforestation in the Chaco spikes in the wake of “illegal” presidential decree stripping back environmental safeguards,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/deforestation-in-the-chaco-spikes-in-the-wake-of-illegal-presidential-decree-stripping-back-environmental-safeguards/.

23  Riveros, Fernando. “The Gran Chaco,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, July 2012,  http://archive.today/2012.07.30-004747/http://www.fao.org/ag/A GP/agpc/doc/Bulletin/GranChaco.htm.

24 Semper-Pascual, Asunción et al. “Mapping extinction debt highlights conservation opportunities for birds and mammals in the South American Chaco,” Journal of Applied Ecology, January 2018, http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.13074/full.

25 “Protecting the Atlantic Forest in Paraguay,” World Land Trust, n.d., http://www.worldlandtrust.org/projects/paraguay/guyra-reta-reserve.

26 Law No. 5.045/13

27 “Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

28 “Argentina plans railways to expand agriculture in north,” The Western Producer, April 2017,  https://www.producer.com/2017/04/argentina-plans-railways-to-expand-agriculture-in-north/.

29 “Plan Belgrano: Avanza la recuperación del tren de cargas en Salta y Jujuy,” Argentinian Government, March 2017, https://www.argentina.gob.ar/noticias/plan-belgrano-avanza-la-recuperacion-del-tren-de-cargas-en-salta-y-jujuy.

30 “Argentina – Soy,” Trase.Earth, 2016, https://goo.gl/SSaoT6.

31 “All countries exporting Soybeans to Europe, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016 https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016&importer= eur&category=87&units=weight.

32 Mooney, Pat et al. “Too Big to Feed,” International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems, October 2017, http://www.ipes-food.org/images/Reports/Concentration_FullReport.pdf.

33 Murphy, Sophia et al. “Cereal Secrets: The world’s largest grain traders and global agriculture,” Oxfam Research Reports, August 2012, https://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/rr-cereal-secrets-grain-traders-agriculture-30082012-en.pdf 

34 “Instalaciones: Acopios,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bungeargentina.com/es/instalaciones/acopios.

35 “Zero Deforestation: Building 21st century value chains,” Bunge, n.d. https://www.bunge.com/sustainability/zero-deforestation.  ; “Ending Deforestation: Cargill is committed to protecting forests and ensuring deforestation-free supply chains,” Cargill, n.d. https://www.cargill.com/sustainability/deforestation.

36 Bellantonio, Marisa et al. “The Ultimate Mystery Meat,” Mighty Earth, February 2017, https://www.mightyearth.org/mysterymeat/ 

37 “Ministry confirms illegality of deforestation in farms owned by politically-connected businessman in Argentina,” Illegal Deforestation Monitor, January 2018, http://www.bad-ag.info/argentinas-government-confirms-illegality-of-deforestation-in-farms-owned-by-politically-connected-businessman/.

38  “Argentina: Country Environmental Analysis,” World Bank Group, May 2016, http://documentos.bancomundial.org/curated/es/218361479799045279/pdf/109527-ENGLISH-PUBLIC-ARG-CEA-Country-Environmental-Analysis-English.pdf.   

39 Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017, https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/. ; Cressey, Daniel. “Widely Used Herbicide Linked to Cancer,” Scientific American, March 2015, https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/.

40 “Macrons says glyphosate to be banned in France within three years,” Reuters, November 2017,  https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-health-glyphosate-macron/macron-says-glyphosate-to-be-banned-in-france-within-three-years-idUSKBN1DR259.

41 Kalverkamp, Michael Álvarez et al. “Meat Atlas: Facts and figures about the animals we eat,” Heinrich Böll Stiftung, January 2014, https://www.boell.de/sites/default/files/meat_atlas2014_kommentierbar.pdf.

42 Ueker, Marly Elaine et al. “Parenteral exposure to pesticides and occurrence of congenital malformations: hospital-based case-control stody,” BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 16(125), August 2016, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4983026/. ;  Ruderman, L et al. “Análisis de la Salud Colectiva Ambiental de Malvinas Argentina-Córdoba Una investigación socio- ambiental y sanitaria a través de técnicas cualitativas y relevamiento epidemiológico cuantitativo,” Reduas, August 2012, http://www.reduas.com.ar/wp-content/uploads/downloads/2013/02/Informe-Malvinas-corregido1.pdf.

43 This interview was conducted in the indigenous language Guarani and was later translated into English. 

44 This interview was conducted in the indigenous language Guarani, and was later translated into English.

45 “Ley Nº 904/81,” Estuato do las Comunidades Indíegenas, n.d.  http://www.tierraviva.org.py/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/PDF.pdf.

46 Paraguayan Law no. 904/81, article 17.

47 Tyrrell, Kelly April. “Study shows Brazil’s Soy Moratorium still needed to preserve the Amazon,” University of Wisconsin-Madison, January 2015,  https://news.wisc.edu/study-shows-brazils-soy-moratorium-still-needed-to-preserve-amazon/.

48  “Companies pledging to tackle soy and cattle driven deforestation in Brazil’s Cerrado nearly triples in just three months,” Tropical Forest Alliance 2020, January 2018, https://www.tfa2020.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Press-release-marking-the-significant-increase-in-company-signatories-to-the-Cerrado-Manifesto-Statement-of-Support-25-Jan-2018.pdf

49 “South America exporting Soybeans to Europe, in 2016 by weight,” Chatham House: The Royal Institute of International Affairs, 2016,  https://resourcetrade.earth/data?year=2016 &exporter=sac&importer=eur&category=87&units=weight 

50 “Glyphosate,” European Commission, n.d. https://ec.europa.eu/food/plant/pesticides/glyphosate_en; https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/widely-used-herbicide-linked-to-cancer/. ; Kelland, Kate. “In glyphosate review, WHO cancer agency edited out ‘non-carcinogenic’ findings,” Reuters, October 2017,  https://www.reuters.com/investigates/special-report/who-iarc-glyphosate/.   

51 Pritchard, Janet. “Developing EU measures to address forest-risk commodities: What can be learned from EU regulation of other sectors?,” Fern, November 2016, http://www.fern.org/sites/fern.org/files/Developing %20EU%20measures_0.pdf.

52 “Agriculture and deforestation,” Fern, April 2017, http://www.fern.org/capreform.

 

 


Et si votre chocolat de la Saint-Valentin avait été gâché par la déforestation?

Et si votre chocolat de la Saint-Valentin avait été gâché par la déforestation?

La destruction des forêts liée à l’exploitation du cacao en Côte d’Ivoire et au Ghana a été bien documentée, notamment par le récent rapport de Mighty Earth, « La déforestation amère du chocolat ». Aujourd’hui, une nouvelle étude démontre que la culture du cacao provoque des déforestations dans d’autres régions du monde, de l’Asie à l’Amazonie. Mighty Earth a cartographié des régions productrices de cacao situées en dehors de l’Afrique de l’Ouest et a pu identifier plusieurs zones qui présentaient des risques élevés de déforestation.

Grâce à des images satellites détaillées et en superposant des cartes documentant la déforestation sur celles des régions productrices de cacao, nous avons pu constater des déboisements massifs en Indonésie, au Cameroun, au Pérou et en Équateur.

Cette carte de la Saint-Valentin nécessite donc une enquête plus approfondie sur les sociétés en cause, et des recherches pour déterminer la part de responsabilité imputable au cacao plutôt qu’à d’autres matières premières. Néanmoins, il est évident que le secteur du chocolat étend désormais son empire à des pays comme l’Indonésie, le Pérou, l’Équateur ou le Cameroun qui tous possèdent de vastes forêts tropicales. Avec une demande à la hausse, le secteur du chocolat risque de se déployer de manière agressive dans les zones tropicales du monde entier et d’exporter dans bien des endroits les mêmes mauvaises pratiques qui ont contribué à la destruction quasi totale des forêts d’Afrique de l’Ouest. Ce qui est arrivé en Côte d’Ivoire et au Ghana doit servir d’avertissement pour les autres pays où se développe la cacaoculture, si le secteur ne rectifie pas le tir en modifiant ses pratiques.

À la suite de notre rapport publié à l’automne 2017, 24 chocolatiers de premier plan se sont engagés auprès des gouvernements du Ghana et de la Côte d’Ivoire à ne plus provoquer de nouvelles déforestations et à reboiser les forêts d’Afrique de l’Ouest. Ils ont également promis une traçabilité du cacao produit dans ces pays. Ces entreprises et les gouvernements ont fort à faire pour tenir leurs promesses. Mais seules quelques sociétés se sont engagées à mettre un terme à la déforestation dans le monde. Il est grand temps pour le reste du secteur du chocolat de suivre l’exemple.

Les sociétés Olam International et Hershey’s ont promis un cacao « zéro déforestation » dans le monde entier, avec effet immédiat, et se sont déclarées en faveur de l’agroforesterie. Quelques autres se sont engagées à changer sous peu leurs pratiques : Barry Callebaut s’est fixé un objectif « zéro déforestation » pour 2025 et Godiva a promis d’appliquer bientôt une politique « zéro déforestation » à l’ensemble de ses matières premières, dont le cacao. D’autres encore comme Mondelēz se sont engagées à un cacao sans déforestation en Afrique de l’Ouest et au-delà, mais pas dans tous les pays. Les sociétés qui luttent pour mettre un terme à la déforestation et pour reboiser ces régions du monde créent un précédent pour le secteur. En devançant les recommandations du Cocoa & Forests Initiative, elles envoient pour la Saint-Valentin un message d’espoir aux animaux menacés, de l’Asie à l’Amazonie.

  • Hershey’s : Nous sommes fiers d’annoncer que nous nous engageons à consolider notre chaîne d’approvisionnement pour le cacao, afin de ne plus générer de nouvelle déforestation. Nous cesserons immédiatement de nous approvisionner dans les régions où de nouvelles déforestations auront été constatées. Par ailleurs, nous avons créé un programme d’agroforesterie qui soutient le cacao cultivé sous couvert forestier et comprend des plantations d’arbres. 
  • Barry Callebaut : Avec son plan Forever Chocolate pour le développement durable, Barry Callebaut s’est engagé à devenir d’ici 2025 « positif en forêt » et « positif en carbone », en s’approvisionnant de manière durable et sans déforestation pour l’ensemble de ses ingrédients. 
  • Godiva : Dans le cadre de son engagement général pour l’amélioration de la vie des communautés et de celle de la planète, Godiva procède à une mise à jour de son code de conduite mondial, de manière à garantir que ses fournisseurs en matières premières — y compris en cacao — s’inscrivent dans des programmes d’approvisionnement luttant contre la déforestation et la dégradation des forêts. 
  • Olam International : Olam Cacao s’est engagée à mettre fin à la déforestation dans sa chaîne d’approvisionnement, au niveau mondial. Cette initiative comprend des formations auprès des agriculteurs afin que ces derniers adoptent des pratiques plus judicieuses du point de vue du climat. La plantation d’arbres d’ombrages en fait également partie. En Côte d’Ivoire, Olam a relevé le niveau de ses exigences pour les agriculteurs en matière de plantation d’arbres — en recommandant 100 arbres «forestry » et 50 arbres d’ombrage par hectare. Pour son approvisionnement direct, Olam s’est fixé pour objectif une traçabilité et une durabilité de 100 % de ses volumes d’ici 2020.
  • Mondelēz : Depuis 2012, nous avons pour ambition de nous approvisionner entièrement en cacao durable, principalement par le biais du programme Cocoa Life. Ce programme, qui opère dans six pays, dont l’Indonésie, met l’accent sur l’environnement et exige un cacao « zéro déforestation ». Nous soutenons aussi des campagnes de formation sur l’environnement et la conservation forestière dans tous les lieux où nous nous approvisionnons en cacao et encourageons les cultures de cacao sous couvert forestier, les cultures intercalaires et l’agroforesterie. Nous avons par ailleurs déjà mis au point un niveau de référence pour surveiller la déforestation en Indonésie. 
  • Halba: pour l’instant, Halba ne possède pas de politique « zéro déforestation », mais y travaille ; la société s’est déjà engagée à compenser toutes les émissions de CO2 de sa chaîne d’approvisionnement grâce à un projet d’agroforesterie et de reboisement au Honduras ; à ce jour, Halba a planté plus de 350 000 arbres au Honduras, au Pérou et au Ghana et s’est engagée dans des pratiques d’agroforesterie dans tous les pays où la société s’approvisionne en cacao, avec un objectif de 70 arbres d’ombrage par hectare.
  • Nestlé :  Nestlé est signataire de la « Cocoa & Forests Initiative » et mène également sur le long terme une politique générale « zéro déforestation » pour ses principales matières premières, y compris le cacao. 
  • Unilever: Afin de mettre un terme à la déforestation liée au cacao, nous nous engageons à nous approvisionner exclusivement en cacao durable, au niveau mondial, toutes zones confondues. De même, notre engagement en matière de lutte contre la déforestation concerne toutes nos matières premières. 

Il est grand temps que l’ensemble du secteur assainisse ses pratiques et adopte rapidement des politiques « zéro déforestation » solides et mondiales pour le cacao. Nous pensons particulièrement aux sociétés dont l’implication dans des chaînes illégales d’approvisionnement de cacao de déforestation (le cacao étant parfois cultivé à l’intérieur de parcs nationaux) avait été identifiée par Mighty Earth dans son dernier rapport.

Nous demandons donc au secteur du chocolat d’agir comme il se doit et d’envoyer pour la Saint-Valentin un message d’espoir aux paresseux du Pérou, aux jaguars d’Équateur et aux Anoas d’Indonésie en sauvant les forêts dans lesquelles ils vivent.

Célèbes : Partie d’une région productrice de cacao en Indonésie, avant et après déforestation

Avant, 2000

Après, 2016

Partie d’une région productrice de cacao au Pérou, avant et après déforestation 

Avant, 2000

Après, 2016

Partie d’une région productrice de cacao en Équateur, avant et après déforestation

Avant, 2000

Après, 2016

Partie d’une région productrice de cacao au Cameroun, avant et après déforestation 

Avant, 2000
Après, 2016

Notes sur la déforestation liée à la production de cacao, au-delà de l’Afrique de l’Ouest :

Au niveau mondial : Au niveau mondial, le déboisement provoqué par la production de cacao, de 1988 à 2008, est estimé approximativement à 2-3 millions d’hectares. Ceci équivaut à 1 % environ de l’ensemble du déboisement. [i] Entre 1990 et 2008, le cacao représentait 8 % de la déforestation importée par les 27 États membres de l’UE. [ii] En se déployant, la culture du cacao menace de nouvelles forêts. « De 2000 à 2014, la production mondiale de fèves de cacao a augmenté de 32 %, passant de 3,4 à 4,5 millions de tonnes — alors que l’empreinte écologique causée par l’utilisation des terres pour les plantations de cacao a bondi à 37 % — passant de 7,6 à 10,4 millions d’hectares. »[iii] Depuis 2007, la cacaoculture s’étend à des pays comme la Papouasie Nouvelle-Guinée, la Malaisie, la République dominicaine, le Libéria, l’Ouganda, la Colombie et la République de Sierra Leone. Elle est susceptible de fragiliser des forêts déjà vulnérables.

Indonésie : L’Indonésie est connue pour sa déforestation liée à l’exploitation de l’huile de palme, du bois et du papier. Mais la cacaoculture s’y est également développée. Le pays se hisse aujourd’hui au rang de 3e producteur mondial de cacao. Entre 1988 et 2007, près de 0,7 million d’hectares de forêts ont été défrichés en Indonésie pour la production de cacao, ce qui équivaut à près de 9 % de la déforestation nationale liée à l’agriculture. [iv] La déforestation mise en évidence par nos cartes ci-dessus se situe dans « l’île du cacao », les Célèbes, où la plupart des 850 000 tonnes annuelles [v] sont produites. En 2017, près de 63 % de la production indonésienne de cacao se concentrait dans l’île des Célèbes. Ses principales régions productrices sont le Sulawesi occidental (18 % de la production indonésienne), le Sulawesi du Sud-Est (17 %) et le Sulawesi du Sud (16 %). [vi] Un expert a rapporté à Mighty Earth qu’à l’exception des plaines alluviales au nord de Mamuju (sur la côte ouest, face à Bornéo) qui ont été partiellement déboisées au milieu des années 1990 par les producteurs d’huile de palme, presque toute la déforestation des Célèbes a pour origine le cacao. Cette déforestation est particulièrement sensible dans les collines (en général, à partir de 20 km de la côte). [vii]

Cameroun : Le cacao devient aussi un facteur de déforestation dans le bassin du Congo, là où se trouvent les plus grandes forêts tropicales intactes au monde. Les statistiques de l’ITC sur les exportations de fèves de cacao indiquent que les exportations du Cameroun sont passées de 131 075 tonnes en 2007 à 263 746 tonnes en 2016. Ces chiffres laissent supposer que le nombre de cacaoyers a doublé (sachant que les récoltes commencent 3 à 5 ans après la plantation), et que certains d’entre eux ont probablement été plantés sur des forêts. En 2012, le gouvernement du Cameroun a annoncé son intention d’intensifier la production de cacao pour la propulser à 600 000 tonnes annuelles d’ici 2020 (contre 225 000 tonnes actuellement). Cette initiative menacerait davantage de forêts, bien que d’après le directeur général de la Société de développement du cacao au Cameroun, ces projets d’expansion de la cacaoculture tournent court. [viii] Déjà en 2014, près de 11 % de l’empreinte écologique des récoltes du Cameroun correspondaient à la production de cacao. La déforestation mise en évidence par nos cartes ci-dessus se situe dans le département de Manyu, dans la région du sud-ouest du Cameroun. Manyu et Meme sont les deux départements du Cameroun où se concentre la production de cacao. [ix] La région du Sud-Ouest produirait à elle seule près de la moitié du cacao du Cameroun. [x] Mamfé est la capitale du cacao du département de Manyu. Depuis novembre 2016, de violents affrontements opposent les séparatistes aux forces de l’ordre. Ces affrontements ont coupé de nombreux acheteurs camerounais des circuits traditionnels de vente. Du cacao serait depuis exporté illégalement vers le Nigeria. [xi] Chez son voisin le Nigeria, on estime que le cacao a contribué, de 1990 à 2008, à 8 % de la déforestation nationale. [xii]

Amazonie péruvienne : Les producteurs de cacao se sont aussi tournés vers l’Amérique du Sud, en particulier vers le Pérou. Les statistiques de l’ITC sur les exportations de fèves de cacao indiquent que les exportations ont progressé, passant de 4 263 tonnes en 2007 à 61 888 tonnes en 2016. La production de cacao aurait été multipliée par 15. Des images satellites de 2012 ont surpris United Cacao en train de détruire près de 2000 hectares de terres pour les convertir en plantation de cacao, mordant sur la forêt amazonienne du Pérou, riche en biodiversité et en carbone. Les plantations de cacao au Pérou ont dû atteindre les 129 842 hectares en 2016. [xiii] La déforestation mise en évidence par nos cartes ci-dessus s’est produite principalement dans les régions d’Ucayali, de Huanuco et de San Martin.

Équateur : Les statistiques de l’ITC sur les exportations de fèves de cacao indiquent que les exportations de l’Équateur ont presque triplé, passant de 80 093 tonnes en 2007 à 227 214 tonnes en 2016. Les zones de cacaoculture ont progressé de 16 600 hectares, entre 2000 et 2008, dans les provinces de Sucumbíos et de Napo. Avec les cultures de plantes fourragères, de cacao et d’huile de palme, le secteur agricole est le principal responsable de la déforestation en Équateur. [xiv] On estime que le cacao est cultivé sur 16 100 hectares dans la province de Sucumbíos et sur 13 500 hectares dans la province d’Orellana. [xv] La déforestation mise en évidence par nos cartes ci-dessus se situe dans les provinces d’Orellana et de Sucumbíos.


Forêt détruite par la culture du cacao © Mighty Earth 2017

Sacs de fèves prêts à être expédiés © Mighty Earth 2017

Jaguar en Équateur © 123RF

Anoa d’Indonésie © 123RF

Paresseux du Pérou © 123RF


Sources:
[i] Kroeger, A. et al. (2017) Eliminating Deforestation from the Cocoa Supply Chain. World Bank Group, March 2017.
[ii] http://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/1.%20Report%20analysis%20of%20impact.pdf
[iii] https://resourcetrade.earth/stories/cocoa-trade-climate-change-and-deforestation#section-171
[iv] FAOSTAT and European Commission. The impact of EU consumption on deforestation: Comprehensive analysis of the impact EU consumption on deforestation. 2013. Technical Report 063.
[v] https://www.rikolto.org/en/project/cocoa-sulawesi-indonesia
[vi] Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture, Directorate General of Estate Crops, Tree Crop Estate Statistics of Indonesia, 2015-2017 cocoa, http://bit.ly/2FUaEBO
[vii] Email exchange with Francois Ruf, February 2018.
[viii] Thomson Reuters Foundation, Extreme weather threatens Cameroon’s hopes of becoming a cocoa giant, 7 June 2017, http://tmsnrt.rs/2nhEXvn.
[ix] International Cocoa Organization (ICCO), Cameroon, http://bit.ly/2EJoYxz.
[x] Reuters, Unrest in Cameroon fuels cocoa smuggling to Nigeria, 16 January 2018, http://reut.rs/2BcYlBk.
[xi]Business in Cameroon, Cameroon’s cocoa production taken over by Nigeria, 29 July 2017, http://bit.ly/2sgGOFE.
Reuters, Unrest in Cameroon fuels cocoa smuggling to Nigeria, 16 January 2018, http://reut.rs/2BcYlBk.
[xii] www.ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/1.%20Report%20analysis%20of%20impact.pdf
[xiv] Satellite images in 2012 showed United Cacao destroying nearly 5000 acres of land for a cocoa plantation, encroaching on the carbon-rich, biodiverse Amazon rainforest in Peru: http://www.wri.org/blog/2015/06/zooming-%E2%80%9Csustainable%E2%80%9D-cocoa-producer-destroys-pristine-forest-peru.
See also: https://news.mongabay.com/2015/01/company-chops-down-rainforest-to-produce-sustainable-chocolate/ and http://maaproject.org/2015/image-9-cacao-tamshiyacu/  for how Matt Finer of the Amazon Conservation Association used Landsat imagery to chronicle the clearing month-by-month and prove that the area was previously primary forest. Meanwhile, Greg Asner of Stanford University’s Carnegie Institution for Science used airborne LiDAR technology to estimate that the patch of forest contained an average of 122 metric tons of carbon per hectare (54.4 tons per acre).” (WRI: http://www.wri.org/blog/2015/08/how-much-rainforest-chocolate-bar and https://cao.carnegiescience.edu/ ).
[xv] UNDP and Ecuadorian Ministry of the Environment (MAE), Sustainable Development of the Ecuadorian Amazon: integrated management of multiple use landscapes and high value conservation forests, March 2015, http://bit.ly/2mE6Sp2.
[xvi] Revista Nera, Oswaldo Viteri Salazar and Jesús Ramos-Martín, Organizational structure and commercialization of coffee and cocoa in the northern amazon region of Ecuador, January-April 2017, http://bit.ly/2Dd4Wyb

ITC Trade in Cocoa Beans, 2007-2016


Tu cacao, besado por la deforestación

Tu cacao, besado por la deforestación

La destrucción de los bosques a causa del cacao en Costa de Marfil y Ghana han sido muy bien documentadas, incluyendo el informe más reciente de Mighty Earth, “El secreto más oscuro del chocolate”. Actualmente, nuevas investigaciones revelan que el cacao está impulsando la deforestación en otras regiones del mundo, desde Asia hasta el Amazonas.

Mighty Earth tomo a su cargo la zonificación de las regiones productoras de cacao en cuatro países fuera de África occidental y descubrió un alto riesgo de deforestación en varias zonas productoras de cacao.

Mediante detallado mapeo satelital y superposición de mapas sobre la deforestación en las regiones productoras de cacao hemos encontrado deforestación a gran escala en regiones productoras de Indonesia, Camerún, Perú y Ecuador.

Este día de San Valentín el mapeo del cacao amerita una investigación más detallada de las empresas impulsoras de la deforestación a nivel mundial que indague cuanto de esa deforestación se atribuye al cacao en relación a otros “commodities” Lo que sin embargo está muy claro es que la industria del chocolate, actualmente se está expandiendo a países como Indonesia, Perú, Ecuador y Camerún que aún se jactan de poseer bosques tropicales. Con la creciente demanda de chocolate está industria está en riesgo de expandirse vertiginosamente hacia naciones alrededor del mundo que cuentan con bosques tropicales y en muchos lugares incluso exportar las mismas malas prácticas que han contribuido a la casi total destrucción de los bosques de África Occidental. Costa de Marfil y Ghana son la moraleja de lo que podría pasar en otros países donde el cultivo de cacao se está expandiendo, si la industria no reforma sus prácticas.

Después de nuestro informe en el otoño de 2O17, 24 empresas líderes de la industria del chocolate se unieron al gobierno de Ghana y de Costa de Marfil en el compromiso de no incurrir en nuevas deforestaciones, reforestar y hacer el seguimiento de la industria en África Occidental.

Estas compañías y los gobiernos tienen mucho por hacer para cumplir sus promesas, solo unas cuantas han realizado un compromiso global de cacao libre de deforestación. Es tiempo que el resto de la industria del chocolate haga lo mismo.

Olam International y Hershey’s se han comprometido al cacao “cero deforestación” a nivel mundial, de vigencia inmediata y a la agroforesteria. Otros pocos se comprometieron a un cambio pronto:  Barry Callebaut apunta a lograr cacao libre de deforestación hasta el año 2025 mientras que Godiva prometió desarrollar pronto una política cruzada – que incluye el cacao. Otros, como Still se han comprometido a obtener Cacao (de varios orígenes) Libre de Deforestación fuera de África Occidental pero aún no a nivel mundial.  Las empresas que luchan para frenar la deforestación a causa del cacao y la repoblación (reverdecimiento) del cacao, están mundialmente sentando un precedente para la industria, yendo más allá la Iniciativa del Cacao y Bosques, enviando San Valentín a la fauna amenazada desde el Asia hasta el Amazonas.

  • Hershey: Nos enorgullece comprometernos a la ‘no deforestación’ en nuestra cadena de suministro evitando abastecernos del cacao de cualquier lugar en el mundo donde hayan sucedido nuevas deforestaciones, esto con efecto inmediato, así como también a la creación de programas de agroforesteria para apoyar el cacao cultivado a la sombra mediante programas de plantación de árboles.
  • Barry Callebaut: Bajo nuestra visión de sustentabilidad ‘Chocolate para Siempre’, Barry Callebaut se ha comprometido a ser Bosque y Carbón Positivo y a abastecernos de ingredientes de manera sostenible, libres de deforestación hasta 2025.
  • Godiva: En el marco de nuestro compromiso de enriquecer a nuestras comunidades y al planeta, Godiva está actualizando nuestro Código de Conducta Global de Abastecimiento para asegurar que los proveedores de los commodities de nuestros ingredientes – incluido el cacao– continúe estableciendo programas de abastecimiento que combatan la deforestación y la degradación de los bosques.
  • Olam International: Olam Cacao está comprometido a detener la deforestación en su cadena global de suministro, la misma que incluye capacitación de agricultores sobre Practicas Climáticas Inteligentes y programas de plantación de árboles de sombra. En Costa de Marfil, Olam escalo en sus recomendaciones a los agricultores sobre plantación de árboles – recomendando 100 arboles de uso forestal y 50 arboles de sombra por hectárea. En su abastecimiento directo, la meta del Cacao de Olam es que 100% de sus volúmenes puedan ser rastreables y sostenibles hasta 2020.
  • Mondelēz: Desde 2012 nuestro objetivo es abastecernos de cacao sostenible, principalmente de Cacao Life que opera en seis países incluyendo Indonesia con un enfoque medioambiental que incluye la no deforestación. Realizamos capacitaciones para la conservación de bosque en todos los lugares donde nos proveemos de cacao y apoyamos el cacao producido bajo sombra, intercultivos y agroforesteria. Estamos ya realizando un estudio de línea base para el seguimiento de la deforestación en Indonesia.
  • Halba: Halba aún no tiene una política para el cacao, pero está trabajando en ello, y la empresa está ya comprometida a compensar todas sus emisiones de CO2 de su cadena de suministros a través de un programa de reforestación y agraforesteria en Honduras; hasta ahora Halba ha plantado más de 350.000 arboles maderables en Honduras, Perú y Ghana y se ha comprometido a la agroforesteria en todos los países donde compra cacao, apuntando a 70 árboles de sombra por hectárea.
  • Nestlé: Nestlé es signataria de la Iniciativa de Cacao y Bosques y témenos una larga trayectoria de políticas de no deforestación para nuestros commodities claves, incluyendo el cacao.
  • Unilever: En términos de compromisos globales para detener la deforestación por el cacao, nuestro compromiso sobre abastecimiento sostenible del 100% de nuestro cacao es orden global y no geográficamente especifico. De manera similar, nuestra posición de eliminar la deforestación de nuestra cadena de suministro es también global no especifica con relación al commodity.

Es hora de que toda la industria sanee sus prácticas e implemente políticas robustas de cero deforestación a nivel mundial – especialmente aquella empresas que Mighty Earth nombrado en nuestro último informe como aquellas que están relacionadas a cadenas de suministro de cacao ilegales que proceden incluso del interior de parques nacionales.

Pedimos a la industria del chocolate hacer lo correcto y enviar San Valentín a los perezosos en el Perú, a los jaguares en Ecuador a los búfalos en Indonesia para salvar sus hogares en los bosques.

Sulawesi: Parte de la región productora de cacao en Indonesia, antes y después de la deforestación

Antes del año 2000

Después de 2016

Parte de la región peruana productora de cacao, antes y después de la deforestación

Antes del 2000

Después del 2016

Parte dela región productora de cacao antes y después de la deforestación

Antes del 2000

Después de 2016

Parte de la región productora de cacao camerunense, antes y después de la deforestación

Antes del 2000
Después del 2016

Notas sobre la deforestación por cacao fuera de África Occidental

Globalmente: la perdida de bosque por la producción de cacao fue aproximadamente de 2-3 millones de hectáreas desde 1988 al 2008, lo que equivale al 1% del total de la perdida de bosque. (i)  El cacao representa el 8% de la deforestación incorporadas en EU27 importaciones netas de productos cultivados, 1990-2008 (ii). El cacao se está esparciendo y al hacerlo, amenaza nuevos bosques. “desde 2000 a 2014, la producción global de granos de cacao se incrementó en un 32 por ciento, de 3.3 a 4.5 millones de toneladas – mientras la huella del uso de suelo de plantaciones de cacao  creció en un 37 por ciento – de 7.6 a 10.4 millones de hectáreas” (iii) La producción de cacao ha estado creciendo desde 2007 hasta ahora en países como Papua Nueva Guinea, Malasia, Republica Dominicana, Liberia, Uganda, Colombia, Sierra Leona, probablemente tensionando aún más allí, bosques vulnerables.

Indonesia: Indonesia es notoria por su deforestación a causa del aceite de palma, madera y papel. Sin embargo, la producción de cacao se ha estado expandiendo También aquí y es el tercer país productor de cacao en el mundo. Entre 1988 y 2007, un Estimado de 0.7 millones de hectáreas de bosques indoneses fueron despejados para la producción de cacao, lo que equivale al 9% del total nacional de la deforestación para cultivos (iv) La deforestación que muestran nuestros mapas arriba están en la “isla de cacao” de Sulawesi, de donde proviene la mayor parte de las 850,000 toneladas anuales de cacao que produce Indonesia (v). En 2017, cerca al 63% de la producción de cacao de Indonesia se concentra en la Isla de Sulawesi. Las provincias en Sulawesi que producen la mayor parte de cacao están en el Sulawesi Oeste (18 % del total de Indonesia), Sulawesi Sudeste (17%) y Sulawesi Sud (16% (vi). Un experto le comento a Mighty Earth que a excepción de las planicies aluviales en la región Norte de Mamuju (Costa Oeste, colindante a Borneo) que fue parcialmente deforestada a mitad de los 1990’s por empresas de aceite de palma, casi toda la deforestación en Sulawesi es por el cacao, especialmente en las Colinas (en general todo lo que está 20 kilómetros atrás de la línea costera) (vii)

Camerún: El cacao también se ha convertido en impulsor de la deforestación en la Cuenca del Congo, los grandes bosques tropicales más intactos del mundo. Las estadísticas del grano de cacao de ITC muestran un incremento en las exportaciones de Camerún de 131,075 en 2007 a 263,746en 2016, lo que sugiere que el doble de árboles de cacao fueron pantados (nótese que la cosecha empieza de 3-5 anos después de realizada la plantación, algunos de los cuales fue probablemente en los bosques. En 2012, el gobierno de Camerún anuncio planes de incrementar la producción de árboles de cacao de alrededor de 225,000 toneladas anuales a 600,000 toneladas para 2020, un movimiento que pondría más bosques en riesgo. (lo que, sin embargo, de acuerdo al director general de la Corporación de Cacao de Camerún, estos planes de expandir el cacao se quedan cortos) (viii) Ya en 2014 más del 11% de la huella del uso de suelo de la producción de cultivo en Camerún fue para el cacao. La deforestación que muestran nuestros mapas arriba es en la división Manyu de la provincia de la región sudeste de Camerún. Manyu y Meme son las dos divisiones en Camerún con la más alta producción de cacao (ix) Se dice que la provincia de la región sud-oeste produce aproximadamente la mitad del cacao de Camerún. (x) Manfe es la capital del cacao en la división Manyu. Desde noviembre de 2016, han ocurrido enfrentamiento violentos entre separatistas y las fuerzas de seguridad. Estos enfrentamientos cortan las rutas tradicionales para muchos de los compradores cameruneses y por esto, parte del cacao es reportado ilegalmente exportado a Nigeria (xi) En la vecina Nigeria, se estima que el cacao ha contribuido con un 8% de la deforestación nacional, 1990-2008 (xii).

Amazonas peruano: Los productor de cacao También se han establecido en sud América, especialmente en Perú. Las estadísticas del grano de cacao de ITC muestran un incremento de 4.263 toneladas en 2007 a 61,888 en 2016. Esto indicaría un aumento en 15 veces la producción de cacao. Las imágenes satelitales en 2012 atraparon in flagrante delito a United Cacao destruyendo cerca de 5000 acres de terreno para plantación de cacao, invadiendo el biodiverso bosque tropical amazónico en Perú. Las plantaciones de cacao en Perú alcanzaron a 129,842 hectáreas en 2016 (xiii) La deforestación que muestran nuestros mapas arriba fueron encontradas en las provincias de Ucayali, Huanuco y San Martin.

Ecuador: Las estadísticas de granos de cacao de exportación de ITC muestran un aumento de 80,093 en 2007 a 227,214 en 2016 casi el triple de aumento. El área cultivada de cacao en las provincias de Sucumbios, Orellana y Napo se incrementaron en 16,600 hectáreas en 2000-2008. El sector agricultor es el principal impulsor de la deforestación ecuatoriana, mediante el cultivo de pastizales para Ganado, cacao y aceite de palma. El cacao se produce sobre un área estimada de 16,100 hectáreas en la provincia de Sucumbios y 13,500 hectáreas en la provincia de Orellana. La deforestación mostrada en nuestros mapas arriba es en las provincias de Orellana y Sucumbios.


Bosques destruidos por el cacao  © Mighty Earth 2017

Bolsas de cacao siendo preparados para su envió © Mighty Earth 2017

Jaguar en Ecuador, © 123RF

Búfalo enano de Sulawesi, © 123RF

Perezoso peruano, © 123RF


Fuentes:

[i] Kroeger, A. et al. (2017) Eliminating Deforestation from the Cocoa Supply Chain. World Bank Group, March 2017.
[ii] http://ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/1.%20Report%20analysis%20of%20impact.pdf
[iii] https://resourcetrade.earth/stories/cocoa-trade-climate-change-and-deforestation#section-171 
[iv] FAOSTAT and European Commission. The impact of EU consumption on deforestation: Comprehensive analysis of the impact EU consumption on deforestation. 2013. Technical Report 063.
[v] https://www.rikolto.org/en/project/cocoa-sulawesi-indonesia
[vi] Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture, Directorate General of Estate Crops, Tree Crop Estate Statistics of Indonesia, 2015-2017 cocoa, http://bit.ly/2FUaEBO
[vii] Email exchange with Francois Ruf, February 2018.
[viii] Thomson Reuters Foundation, Extreme weather threatens Cameroon’s hopes of becoming a cocoa giant, 7 June 2017, http://tmsnrt.rs/2nhEXvn.
[ix] International Cocoa Organization (ICCO), Cameroon, http://bit.ly/2EJoYxz.
[x] Reuters, Unrest in Cameroon fuels cocoa smuggling to Nigeria, 16 January 2018, http://reut.rs/2BcYlBk.
[xi]Business in Cameroon, Cameroon’s cocoa production taken over by Nigeria, 29 July 2017, http://bit.ly/2sgGOFE.
Reuters, Unrest in Cameroon fuels cocoa smuggling to Nigeria, 16 January 2018, http://reut.rs/2BcYlBk.
[xii] www.ec.europa.eu/environment/forests/pdf/1.%20Report%20analysis%20of%20impact.pdf
[xiv] Satellite images in 2012 showed United Cacao destroying nearly 5000 acres of land for a cocoa plantation, encroaching on the carbon-rich, biodiverse Amazon rainforest in Perú: http://www.wri.org/blog/2015/06/zooming-%E2%80%9Csustainable%E2%80%9D-cocoa-producer-destroys-pristine-forest-peru.
See also: https://news.mongabay.com/2015/01/company-chops-down-rainforest-to-produce-sustainable-chocolate/ and http://maaproject.org/2015/image-9-cacao-tamshiyacu/  for how Matt Finer of the Amazon Conservation Association used Landsat imagery to chronicle the clearing month-by-month and prove that the área was previously primary forest. Meanwhile, Greg Asner of Stanford University’s Carnegie Institution for Science used airborne LiDAR technology to estimate that the patch of forest contained an average of 122 metric tons of carbon per hectare (54.4 tons per acre).” (WRI: http://www.wri.org/blog/2015/08/how-much-rainforest-chocolate-bar and https://cao.carnegiescience.edu/ ).
[xv] UNDP and Ecuadorian Ministry of the Environment (MAE), Sustainable Development of the Ecuadorian Amazon: integrated management of multiple use landscapes and high value conservation forests, March 2015, http://bit.ly/2mE6Sp2.
[xvi] Revista Nera, Oswaldo Viteri Salazar and Jesús Ramos-Martín, Organizational structure and commercialization of coffee and cocoa in the northern amazon región of Ecuador, January-April 2017, http://bit.ly/2Dd4Wyb.


Une nouvelle enquête révèle que les producteurs de biodiesel « verts » sont à l’origine d’une déforestation massive en Argentine

Ces biodiesels pourraient s’acheminer vers la France

Une nouvelle enquête, L’Argentine brûlée : tromperie et déforestation pour le biodiesel, menée par les organisations Mighty Earth et ActionAid USA démontre que le biodiesel n’est pas du tout un carburant aussi vert que les producteurs industriels ne le prétendent. Des enquêteurs ont documenté sur le terrain comment 12 140 hectares de forêt ont été détruits par des bulldozers et des incendies… pour semer de nouveaux champs de soja dans le nord de l’Argentine. Transformé en biodiesel, ce soja est ensuite destiné à l’exportation. Principal fournisseur de biodiesel au monde, l’Argentine est actuellement un point chaud mondial de la déforestation. Cette déforestation est majoritairement causée par la production de soja.

Mighty Earth et ActionAid USA ont mandaté une équipe de terrain dans la forêt du Chaco en Argentine afin d’évaluer l’ampleur de cette destruction. L’équipe s’est rendue sur dix sites différents où elle a pu constater une déforestation rapide liée à la production de soja. Cette déforestation a pu être documentée au sol, mais également à l’aide de drones aériens. L’équipe a découvert que de nouveaux champs de soja ont été plantés au milieu de forêts intactes et dans d’autres endroits et que des incendies massifs ont été utilisés pour défricher ces terres.

Bien que les normes existantes sur les carburants renouvelables dans l’UE exigent que le biodiesel ne soit pas produit sur des terres récemment défrichées, l’enquête a pu prouver que les principaux producteurs de biodiesel comme Cargill et Bunge poursuivaient leurs opérations de production de soja dans les zones où d’importantes déforestations ont eu lieu. « L’indrustrie prétend être propre, mais en realite si elle entre dans les écuries d'Augias, c'est pour en remettre », a déclaré Rose Garr, directrice de campagne de Mighty Earth, « a cause de leur deforestation les biocarburants empirent generalement le changement climatique au lieu d’ameliorer la situation ».

En plus des impacts environnementaux de cette production, les membres des communautés locales ont noté de graves impacts sur leur santé qu’ils imputent à l’accroissement de la production de soja stimulée par les biocarburants. De nombreuses familles ont ainsi signalé des empoisonnements causés par les pesticides associés à cette production, comme le glyphosate qui est parfois répandu sur les champs par voie aérienne.

« Les grandes entreprises agroalimentaires veulent vous faire croire qu’elles nourrissent le monde, mais elles ne le font pas : les enfants tombent malades, les habitants sont expulsés de leurs terres, et les animaux sont tués, pour produire de l’huile de soja destinée à alimenter les réservoirs de nos voitures », a déclaré Kelly Stone, analyste politique chez ActionAid USA. « La réforme de nos politiques agricoles constitue un élément important de la lutte contre le changement climatique, mais les droits des personnes à posséder et à cultiver leurs propres terres et leur droit à un environnement propre ne doivent pas être sacrifiés. »

Si l’Argentine souffre, l’industrie américaine du biodiesel en a tiré profit. Mais bientôt, l’Europe pourrait devenir la destination principale de ce biocarburant sale. Auparavant les États-Unis constituaient le premier débouché de ce carburant, mais les récentes taxes americaines sur les importations argentines de biodiesel vont estomper ces imports. En revanche, de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, l’Union européenne pourrait rouvrir son marché. Une réforme de la directive sur les énergies renouvelables de l’UE sera bientôt votée, et l’UE pourrait devenir la nouvelle destination de ce soja argentin. Ce rapport est donc publié alors qu’une bataille législative européenne capitale s’engage. « La politique européenne devrait viser à assainir notre secteur des transports. Mais si elle permet l’importation de biodiesel argentin à partir de soja, elle subventionnerait au contraire des carburants encore plus polluants que le pétrole, a déclaré Rose Garr. » Mighty Earth et ActionAid USA demandent donc à l’Europe de limiter ou d’arrêter tout soutien pour le biodiesel alimentaire et les autres biocarburants alimentaires. En outre, tout producteur de biodiesel devrait adopter et appliquer des engagements « zéro déforestation, zéro exploitation » dans leurs chaînes mondiales d’approvisionnement afin de s’assurer que le soja soit produit sans entraîner de déforestation. Tout est dans la balance pour l’environnement argentin. La France peut intervenir pour garantir que les énergies renouvelables pour le transport de l’UE sont véritablement vertes et ne détruisent pas secrètement les forêts argentines.

 

 

Mighty Earth

Migthy Earth est une organisation internationale de campagnes environnementales qui s’attache à la protection des forêts, à la conservation des océans, et se préoccupe du changement climatique. Nous travaillons en Afrique, en Asie du Sud-Est, en Amérique latine et en Amérique du Nord pour mener des actions à grande échelle en faveur d’une agriculture responsable qui respecte les écosystèmes naturels, la vie sauvage, l’eau et les droits des communautés locales. L’équipe mondiale de Mighty Earth a joué un rôle décisif en persuadant les plus grandes entreprises mondiales de l’agroalimentaire d’améliorer drastiquement leurs politiques et leurs pratiques environnementales et sociales. Vous trouverez plus d’information au sujet de Mighty Earth sur : https://www.mightyearth.org/.

 

ActionAid USA

ActionAid a pour mission de mettre fin à la pauvreté et à l’injustice en investissant localement dans des solutionneurs de problèmes, c’est-à-dire des personnes motivées et engagées, déterminées à changer le monde qui les entoure. Nous investissons activement dans des personnes efficaces qui vivent dans la pauvreté et l’exclusion dans 45 pays à travers le monde. ActionAid met en relation ces solutionneurs de problèmes avec des personnes dont les décisions affectent leur vie quotidienne, afin qu’elles puissent comprendre et revendiquer leurs droits, et apporter en conséquence des changements durables. ActionAid USA milite pour une réforme de la norme Renewal Fuel en raison des impacts de cette politique sur les droits fonciers et la sécurité alimentaire des populations aux États-Unis et dans le monde. https://www.actionaidusa.org/

 


Avia Terai Community Members Tell Their Stories

Avia Terai Community Members Tell Their Stories 

Catalina is a local farmer in Argentina’s Chaco province. Here, she talks about some of the medical problems she’s seeing linked to soy production for biofuels.

Dr. Maria del Carmen Seveso talks about some of the medical problems she is seeing as a result of soy production for biofuels in her region.

Silvia Ponce lives in the village of Avia Terai. Her daughter was born in 2008 with a number of health problems that she believes are linked to soy production for biofuels in her region.