Uncategorized

AERIAL SHOT

Largest Dutch pension fund involved in clearing rainforest

ABP invests in controversial palm oil plantation in Papua

3 April 2018. Leontien Aarnoudse for OneWorld magazine.

Over 27,000 hectares of tropical rainforest has been cleared for a single palm oil plantation in Papua Indonesia. Satellite images from the American organization Mighty Earth shows this clearing of the rainforest. The company that caused the deforestation is partly funded with Dutch pension money of ABP, the fifth largest pension fund of the world.

Linus Batia Omba (29) is not easily frightened, but this time he was. “They were shooting right over my head. The bullet hit my hair, but I was not hurt.” The Indonesian Papua resident tells how Indonesian soldiers intimidated him, because he stood up for the land rights of the Mandobo, who lived in the area where the palm oil plantation is located now.

174 million from pension fund ABP

In the South-Eastern Merauke regency, an area larger than the municipality of Amsterdam has been cleared for just one oil palm farm: PT Bio Inti Agrindo (PT BIA). Satellite images made by the environmental organization Mighty Earth showed that. The logging is not an illegal activity as the company received a permit from the Indonesian government. However, the area consisted of virgin forests, and half of it was primary forest, according to maps from the Indonesian Ministry of Forests. Clearing primary forest is a no-go in various international guidelines.

According to the World Wildlife Fund, the rainforests on the island of New Guinea - which Papua is part of – are the third largest in the world. 5 percent of all species of animals in the world live on this small part of the earth, two thirds of these animals can only be found on this island. “The forests are relatively pristine. Their conservation is essential for nature conservation”, says Lars Hein, Dutch professor of ecosystem services and environmental change at the Wageningen University in The Netherlands.

Local residents say that before the arrival of the plantation they were not sufficiently informed about the use of the land where they lived. They also explained that a river they used for drinking water, is contaminated because the plantation company discharges its wastewater there. PT BIA is mainly owned by Posco Daewoo, a South Korean company specialized in international trade, steel processing, oil, gas, coal and palm oil. The Dutch pension fund ABP is investing four million euros in Posco Daewoo, and a total of more than 174 million euros in all business units of Posco Daewoo, Posco and Daewoo.

Logging with a permit

In January 2007 PT BIA obtained a license from the Indonesian government for the construction of an oil palm plantation in the Ulilin district, which is located in the Merauke Regency. In 2013, 36,400 hectares of forest land were allocated, three quarters of which (27,369 hectares) have already been deforested.

'Burning skin'                                                                                                                                                                                             

The residents of the area say that they were not sufficiently consulted in advance of this large scale deforestation. (see box). “This land is intended for our children and grandchildren. Nobody asked us on forehand if they could use our land”, Omba says via an interpreter on the telephone. He stands under an oil palm in a place where the rainforest was uprooted in 2010, and which was also home to protected animals, including the tree kangaroo, the cuscus - a nephew of the marsupial -, the cassowary bird and the bird of paradise. There were deer, kangaroos and wild boars living in this jungle. But when the rainforest was replaced by oil palms, little of the rich fauna remained.

The reason Omba tells his story on the phone is because it is almost impossible for foreign journalists to access Papua. The Indonesian government keeps the area closed off properly. And with twenty army posts and military checkpoints in the area, slipping in with blond hair is practically impossible.

Because of that, local pastor Nicodemus Rumbayan (38) also tells us about the consequences of the disappearing rainforest through his cell phone. “Now that there is no more forest, it is warmer here. There are floods and people beg for food because they have lost their source of income.” He tells how people used to get young bamboo from the forest. And sago, a traditional staple food that residents extract from the marrow of a tree trunk. “What should the people live off now that the rainforest is no longer here?”, he asks himself. “If you have no land, you can’t collect firewood or hunt for wild boar that you eat or sell for money. The Marind, Mandobo and Yeinan communities have lost their source of income.”

The Bian River has also been polluted by the palm oil company, says another pastor, Anselmus Amo (39): “PT BIA dumps its waste water underground and it ends up in the river.” Pastor Rumbayan adds: “In 2015, I held a service in the Silil village, the fish in the Bian river there were all dead.” He continues: “Some people, including myself, itching and a burning skin because of the river water.”

No permission

The Catholic pastor Anslemus Amo, who lived in the area for many years and listened to plenty of people’s stories, says that when the palm oil company started logging, no Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) was done. This is a fixed human right for the local residents, which companies and governments must adhere to. Posco Daewoo reports in a written response that it has carried out FPIC. The spokesperson of the company also states that several public hearings took place. Amo confirms that, but states: “Public hearings are not the same as FPIC.”

On request, Posco Daewoo's spokesperson sends a signed agreement on land rights (2016), and another document indicating that the affected communities have received compensation (2010). Pastor Rumbayan places the signatures in a different light: “When PT BIA came here, they negotiated with individuals pretending to represent traditional land rights.” He sent a document about a lawsuit against the company and another community as they believe that they’ve received unjustified compensation for land that did not belong to them.

Posco Daewoo claims to have never received a lawsuit document, and points out that these land conflicts occur in the adjacent area. In any case, it is a complicated puzzle, from which a clear conclusion can be drawn: there is still no consensus on the land rights.

'Contributing to a sustainable world'

On its website, the Dutch pension fund ABP claims that it wants 'a good pension for everyone' and wants to 'contribute to a sustainable world'. However, neither ABP nor asset manager APG, which owns the listed shares of Posco Daewoo, are members of the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), which is a standard for sustainable palm oil. This initiative, of which several financiers are members, does not guarantee but makes an attempt to prevent human rights violations and deforestation of primary forests. APG says it encourages companies in which it invests to become a RSPO-member, like Posco Daewoo, which applied for membership in December 2017.

ABP also has climate ambitions. Their Sustainable and Responsible Investment report (2016) states that the pension fund wants the companies in which it invests to emit less CO2. A promise that conflicts with the practice of companies that remove tropical forests, as they store CO2. Tropical forests contain about a quarter of all carbon stored in trees and the vegetation on the land. Deforestation therefore leads to a large emission of CO2. According to scientists, 10 percent of global CO2 emissions is caused by deforestation in the tropics.

158 fires

When you think of deforestation, you think of chainsaws and excavators. But there is another way to clear the green: by burning it. It is a dangerous, polluting method that is forbidden in Indonesia. In the report Burning Paradise (2016), that research agency AidEnvironment made on behalf of Mighty Earth, it states that there were 158 fires in PT BIA's permit area in September and October 2015.

That was the year in which Indonesia had to deal with numerous forest and peat fires. The suffocating smoke caused an estimated 100,000 premature deaths and Indonesia became one of the world's largest CO2 emitters. It is unclear whether the fires on PT BIA's site have been lit by Posco Daewoo or not. Posco Daewoo claims that the fires are caused by the natural phenomenon El Niño. But lighted or not, the Indonesian government holds companies responsible for the fires within their concession area. It is remarkable that the fires took place in the Eastern area, where according to satellite images earlier that year large trees have been removed, probably for the timber sale.

Conscious risks

More information on the estimated impact of the palm oil company on the living environment can be found in a leaked analysis report of 228 pages. This so-called AMDAL analysis is mandatory for the construction of a new oil palm plantation, but these reports are rarely seen by the public. The report is full of examples showing that PT BIA was fully aware of the numerous risks its arrival would bring.

It says: “The migration of protected wild animals for mammalian species cuscus, tree kangaroo, and deer is permanent and irreversible.” And makes these predictions: “the degradation of Bian River’s and Fly River’s water quality, the increasing rate of soil erosion, the disturbance to protected flora/vegetation and fauna/wild animals, local community’s complaint and restlessness (community’s perception),, community’s health”. And this: “A less healthy utilization of water shall make it easier for community to catch diarrhea and skin diseases”. Exactly what happened to Pastor Rumbayan.

Posco Daewoo reports that they test the river water every six months. The test results state that the water meets the quality standards, as Posco Daewoo claims. But it also states that the test samples were brought in in an unsealed jerry can or bottle. In 2015, it is explicitly stated that the samples were supplied by the company itself. Which makes the reliability of the results questionable.

A frequently heard argument is that palm oil companies contribute to economic development in a particular region. After all, a large plantation offers infrastructure and work to many employees, in this case to more than 3,000 people. But those jobs are not for everyone. PT BIA, for example, brings in most employees from other islands such as Java or Flores, says Father Rumbayan. The medical service and after-school activities that PT BIA would offer, as stated in their sustainability report, are unknown to the pastor.

Stay or walk away?

In 2015, the Norwegian Government Pension Fund decided to exclude Global Posco Daewoo from investment because of an 'unacceptable risk' of 'severe environmental damage caused by the conversion of tropical forest to oil palm plantations'. The question is whether ABP will also do that. “We strive to not run away from the problems immediately,” says APG's Director of Global Responsible Investment & Governance Yoo-Kyong Park, who also speaks on behalf of ABP. “We would rather do our best to change the behaviour of the company. We want to use our power to exert pressure as a shareholder.”

A spokesperson for Posco Daewoo reports that “PT BIA has decided to stop forest felling for now, until a consultant gives further advice”. But the promised contract from the end of February with that consultant, isn’t there yet. And Posco Daewoo didn’t announce its halt on the forest clearing to the audience. “We expect to sign a contract this month”, writes the spokesperson at the beginning of March.

Deborah Lapidus, campaigner at Mighty Earth, is in discussion with both parties and says: “ABP has constructively engaged with Posco Daewoo over several months, who blatantly lie about its progress.” If the company does not keep its promises, ABP must impose sanctions, she says: “We ask Posco Daewoo to announce a public moratorium on new development, and to hire a credible consultant to help clean up its act. If Posco Daewoo doesn’t deliver within two weeks, ABP should withdraw its investments.”

The Dutch environmental organization Milieudefensie follows the discussions from the Netherlands. The action group demands that ABP no longer invests in companies that take part in deforestation, such as Posco, and requests the pension fund to withdraw its investments.

Campaign manager for the forests of Friends of the Earth Rolf Schipper: “The fact that ABP invests in palm oil companies that destroy rainforests is incomprehensible. You must be able to trust that your pension money contributes to a better world, as ABP states, and not to large- scale deforestation, human rights violations or the extinction of wild animals.”

Read the original article in Dutch

All rights reserved.


¿Cuántos árboles caen en América por la carne que se come en Europa?

El País | Mar. 26, 2018

La ONG Mighty Earth denuncia que el pienso del ganado europeo incluye soja procedente de tierras deforestadas en Argentina y Paraguay.

Read more


Urwaldrodung für deutsche Fleischproduktion

Bild | Mar. 26 2018 

In der Region Gran Chaco zwischen Argentinien, Bolivien und Paraguay werden für die Kultivierung von Soja Tausende Hektar Urwald gerodet. Das ergaben Recherchen der US-Umweltschutzorganisation Mighty Earth. Außerdem würden „enorme Mengen an chemischem Dünger und giftigen Pestiziden wie dem Pflanzenschutzmittel Glyphosat“ benötigt.

Read more


Interpellation de l’industrie française de la viande : les impacts dramatiques de la culture du soja en Amérique latine

Interpellation de l’industrie française de la viande : les impacts dramatiques de la culture du soja en Amérique latine

Lire le rapport

Une nouvelle enquête internationale, « Quand la déforestation s’invite à notre table », menée par Mighty Earth, Rainforest Foundation Norway et Fern, révèle que la production mondiale de viande entraîne en Argentine et au Paraguay une déforestation massive, des atteintes à la santé ainsi que des violations des droits humains. Mighty Earth, France Nature Environnement (FNE) et Sherpa interpellent 20 entreprises de l’industrie agroalimentaire et de la grande distribution française sur les conséquences désastreuses du soja utilisé dans l’alimentation des animaux d’élevage et les rappellent à leur « devoir de vigilance » sur leurs sources d’approvisionnement.

(Paris, le 26 mars 2017) – Un an exactement après l’adoption de la loi sur le devoir de vigilance des maisons mères, nos associations interpellent des entreprises de l’industrie agroalimentaire et de la grande distribution pour les prévenir que leurs chaînes de production pourraient contenir du soja produit au détriment de l’environnement et des droits humains. Auchan, Bigard, Carrefour, Casino, Cooperl, LDC, Lactalis, Sodexo et Super U et onze autres entreprises devraient demander à leurs fournisseurs de cesser immédiatement de s’approvisionner, directement ou indirectement, auprès des producteurs de soja responsables de la déforestation.

Publié ce jour, le rapport « Quand la déforestation s’invite à notre table » révèle la déforestation massive menée par les producteurs de soja dans le Gran Chaco (Argentine-Paraguay) destiné à nourrir les animaux d’élevage dans le monde entier. En 2016, la France a importé 3,9 millions de tonnes de produits à base de graines de soja, dont la majorité provenait d’Amérique Latine. Ce soja a servi à nourrir poulets et cochons élevés localement.

« Le nombre de zones ayant été détruites est stupéfiant. Nous avons vu des bulldozers raser de larges forêts et prairies jusqu’alors intactes, ainsi que de gigantesques incendies saturant l’air de fumée. », dit Anahita Yousefi, directrice de campagnes chez Mighty Earth. « Si le Gran Chaco a traditionnellement toujours été moins surveillé que d’autres biomes en Amérique Latine, comme la forêt amazonienne, c’est un écosystème extrêmement important, et il n’existe aucune raison de le détruire. »

L’enquête révèle que les sociétés américaines Cargill et Bunge sont les plus grands acheteurs, et revendeurs, de ce soja. Contactées par Mighty Earth, ces sociétés n’ont pas été en mesure de fournir des informations concernant le niveau de traçabilité de leur chaîne de production.

L’enquête révèle également que l’industrialisation de la production de soja entraîne des effets dévastateurs sur la santé publique et génère des conflits sociaux. Un grand nombre des communautés vivant à côté de plantations de soja, ainsi que des populations autochtones dépendant entièrement de la forêt, ont vu ces plantations empiéter sur leurs terres et ont été forcées de les quitter. En outre, ces communautés ont été frappées par une nette augmentation de problèmes de santé liés à l’usage intensif de pesticides.

Il y a un an, la loi sur le devoir de vigilance des sociétés mères était adoptée par le Parlement français. Les grandes entreprises implantées sur le territoire français ont depuis une obligation légale d’identifier et de prévenir les atteintes graves aux droits humains et à l’environnement dans leurs chaînes de valeurs. Ces entreprises doivent rendre compte de façon transparente des mesures prises à cette fin dans un Plan de Vigilance rendu public. Les manquements à cette obligation peuvent entraîner des conséquences judiciaires pour les entreprises concernées.

Dans des courriers (voir ci-dessous) adressés à Auchan, Bigard, Carrefour, Casino, Cooperl, LDC, Lactalis, Sodexo et Super U et onze autres entreprises, Mighty Earth, Sherpa et France Nature Environnement appellent ces entreprises à demander d’étendre immédiatement le moratoire en place depuis 10 ans en Amazonie brésilienne, à l’ensemble de l’Amérique du Sud, pour exclure des circuits commerciaux les fournisseurs cultivant du soja sur des zones de déforestation.

Nous appelons l’industrie agroalimentaire et la grande distribution française à faire la lumière sur les conditions de production du soja présent directement ou indirectement dans sa chaîne de valeur, en fournissant des informations sur la traçabilité des produits et les mesures qu’elles envisagent de prendre pour limiter les impacts négatifs de la production de soja.

« Quand la déforestation s’invite à notre table », impacts et responsabilité des producteurs de viande sur la deforestation Le Gran Chaco, un écosystème extraordinaire menacé par la déforestation et le soja.

Pour mener cette enquête, Mighty Earth a réalisé, sur la base d’images satellite, une cartographie des zones où la déforestation est la plus rapide. Cette cartographie a permis de découvrir que le Gran Chaco, écosystème extraordinaire, riche en biodiversité a, en grande partie, été rasé et brûlé afin d’être converti à la culture du soja. Il constitue l’habitat d’espèces telles que le jaguar, le petit tatou velu, ou encore le tamanoir. La production de soja sur ces terres est également nocive pour les communautés autochtones, telles que les Ayoreo, les Chamacoco, les Enxet, les Guarayo, et bien d’autres.

Une équipe s’est rendue sur le terrain pour visiter vingt sites du Chaco subissant une forte déforestation en lien avec la production de soja. Différents outils ont été utilisés pour étudier la déforestation : enquêtes sur le terrain, entretien avec les agriculteurs et membres de communautés locales et survol des zones en cours de déforestation par des drones. Nous avons ainsi pu constater la présence d’innombrables plantations de soja et des incendies provoqués de façon à détruire les forêts et la végétation, ainsi que des habitats naturels…

Vous retrouverez ici plusieurs images et vidéos provenant de notre enquête de terrain.

 

Communautés déplacées et impacts des pesticides sur la santé

En plus de la destruction de l’environnement, Mighty Earth a découvert que l’industrialisation de la production de soja entraînait également des effets dévastateurs sur la santé publique, ainsi que des conflits sociaux. Un grand nombre des communautés vivant à côté de plantations de soja, ainsi que des populations autochtones dépendant entièrement de la forêt, ont vu ces plantations empiéter sur leurs terres. Dans un grand nombre de cas, ces personnes ont été forcées de quitter leurs terres, sur lesquelles leurs familles avaient vécu pendant plusieurs générations.

En outre, ces communautés ont été frappées par une nette augmentation de problèmes de santé. Ainsi, s’y sont développés des cancers, des anomalies congénitales, des fausses-couches et d’autres maladies liées à une trop grande exposition aux pesticides et aux herbicides, comme le glyphosate, utilisé pour la culture du soja, et souvent épandu par avion, directement au-dessus de la population.

« L’Union européenne fait partie des principaux importateurs de produits cultivés sur des terrains illégalement déboisés. Cette culture a des effets désastreux pour les forêts, les populations, ainsi que le climat. L’usage intensif de pesticides dans l’optique de produire ces produits agricoles provoque également d’importants dégâts sanitaires. L’Union européenne a réglementé ses importations en matière de bois et de poisson d’origines illégales. Il est plus temps qu’elle en fasse de même avec les produits agricoles à haut risque pour les forêts, afin de garantir qu’ils soient exempts de toute déforestation, accaparement des terres et autres violations des droits humains » déclare Nicole Posterer, directrice de campagnes « consommation » chez Fern.

 

Cargill et Bunge responsables de la déforestation ?

Mighty Earth a découvert, lors de notre enquête, que les compagnies américaines Cargill et Bunge – dont la question de la responsabilité avait déjà été évoquée lors d’une précédente enquête, – sont les plus grands acheteurs de ce soja. Cargill et Bunge ont toutes deux engagé des politiques de développement durable. Toutefois, lorsque nous les avons contactées pour discuter des résultats de notre enquête en Argentine et au Paraguay, elles n’ont pas été en mesure de nous fournir d’informations concernant le niveau de traçabilité de leur chaîne de production. Sans traçabilité digne de ce nom, ces entreprises ne peuvent connaître l’origine réelle du soja qu’elles achètent. Les sociétés Cargill et Bunge ont donc échoué à instaurer des mécanismes de traçabilité des produits qu’elles commercialisent pour s’assurer de l’absence d’impacts à l’environnement et aux droits humains.

« Aussi longtemps que les marchands de soja n’agiront pas pour endiguer la déforestation, il est de la responsabilité des sociétés de l’industrie de la viande, des supermarchés, et des investisseurs de réclamer aux marchands de soja un soja n’ayant pas été produit au détriment de forêts. Certains investisseurs, comme le Fonds de Pension Global norvégien, devraient financièrement sanctionner la société Bunge, du fait de ses multiples échecs à endiguer la déforestation » affirme Ida Breckan Claudi, conseillère en politique publique chez Rainforest Foundation Norway.

Traçabilité du soja : appel à la vigilance et à la transparence des producteurs et distributeurs français de viande

Mighty Earth, Sherpa et France Nature Environnement annoncent également qu’ils alertent 20 entreprises françaises sur le fait que leurs chaînes de production pourraient contenir du soja produit au détriment de forêts et des droits humains.

« On ne peut qu’encourager l’industrie française à faire la lumière sur les conditions de production du soja qu’elle achète, en fournissant des informations sur sa traçabilité et sur les mesures prises par les sociétés pour limiter les impacts négatifs de leurs activités en lien avec la production de soja. La publication sincère, exhaustive et accessible de ce type d’information est déterminante, notamment pour le respect d’obligations telles que celles issues de la loi sur le devoir de vigilance, qui fête actuellement ses un an ! » déclare Sandra Cossart, directrice de l’Association Sherpa.

 

Une catastrophe evitable

En définitive, les destructions en cours dans le Gran Chaco d’Argentine et du Paraguay sont totalement évitables. En Amérique latine, il y a plus de 650 millions d’hectares cultivables où l’agriculture est possible sans créer de nouvelles menaces pour les écosystèmes locaux. Dans l’Amazonie brésilienne, depuis plus de 10 ans, l’industrie du soja (y compris Cargill et Bunge) a appliqué un moratoire sur le soja. Ce moratoire a permis de déplacer les nouvelles productions sur des terrains d’ores et déjà cultivables. Il est considéré par tous comme un succès, contribuant à la préservation de la forêt amazonienne. Malheureusement, cette initiative n’a pas dépassé le territoire de la partie brésilienne de l’Amazonie.

« Notre alimentation et notre agriculture ont de très forts impacts sur la nature qu’il ne faut pas oublier, même si ces conséquences se font parfois ressentir de l’autre côté du monde. La Stratégie de lutte contre la déforestation importée que va lancer le gouvernement doit être l’occasion de mettre en œuvre des mesures fortes pour protéger nos écosystèmes les plus riches en biodiversité et les populations locales. Mais il faut aussi revoir nos modèles agricoles et alimentaires et faire le choix de modèles plus durables où nous consommons moins de protéines animales mais de meilleure qualité », soutient Michel Dubromel, Président de France Nature Environnement.

Mighty Earth, Rainforest Norway, Fern, Sherpa, France Nature Environnement et une coalition d’autres organisations demandent aux entreprises du soja d’étendre immédiatement ce moratoire aux autres régions d’Amérique Latine où le soja est cultivé, notamment le Gran Chaco, le bassin amazonien de la Bolivie, et le Cerrado brésilien.


Senior Director of Forest Campaigns

What We Need:

We are hiring an experienced senior director to lead our work on forests, with a significant focus on overseeing our campaigns to protect forests and land rights in Southeast Asia and South America. A major focus of our work is using creative campaigns to persuade the leading private sector companies connected to deforestation to change their practices. In addition, we work closely with governments, civil society, and indigenous communities in forest nations, conduct comprehensive remote sensing monitoring, develop practical solutions, and work with a range of different stakeholders.

We are looking for a creative, nimble and experienced Campaign Director who can lead large-scale international campaigns that include:

  • Developing long and short-term strategic plans;
  • Integrating investigations, communications, and field organizing into compelling campaigns;
  • Negotiating with CEOs and senior leadership in target companies;
  • Conducting advocacy with high-level policymakers and lawmakers for lasting reforms;
  • Working closely with civil society organizations in key countries;
  • Tracking campaign benchmarks;
  • Coordinating with campaign partners; and
  • Advising international philanthropies and donor governments.
  • Fundraising (primarily from large foundations)

Regional and subject-matter expertise are a requirement for this job.

Spanish, Portuguese, Bahasa Indonesia, Chinese, or French language proficiency will be particularly helpful.

This position is based in Washington, DC, and is being offered in partnership with Waxman Strategies, a mission-driven consulting firm that supports Mighty Earth's work.  Significant international travel is part of the job.

Compensation: Competitive and commensurate with experience, and includes a generous benefits package.

Application Deadline: To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to [email protected] by Monday, April 30th at 5pm.

We are an equal opportunity employer; we strictly prohibit discrimination against any employee or applicant on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity or expression and any other characteristic protected by law.

 


Campaign Director - African Forests

 What We Need:

One of the most significant areas of focus is the protection of the world’s tropical rainforests, which are critical to stopping climate change, protecting endangered wildlife, and providing homes for indigenous communities. Through creative campaigns and savvy negotiating, our team has achieved a series of victories over the last several years that have secured commitments from the world’s leading agriculture and consumer companies to eliminate deforestation across their supply chains. We recently achieved a major breakthrough that convinced the entire chocolate and cocoa industries to adopt strong forest conservation and restoration commitments in West Africa, and also have achieved important protections for great ape habitat from palm oil and rubber expansion in the Congo Basin. But there is much more work to do to ensure that these policies are implemented across Africa and to lay the groundwork for government action, including groundbreaking new conservation policies, improved governance, and lasting legal reforms.

To lead this effort, we are looking for a talented African Forests Campaign Director to oversee campaigning on private sector action and also law and policy advocacy to achieve change across commodities such as palm oil, cocoa, and rubber. The candidate will help us continue to expand our work on the protection of the forests, wildlife and communities of the Congo Basin and West Africa.

We are looking for a creative, nimble and experienced Campaign Director who can lead a large-scale international campaign that includes:

  • Developing long and short-term strategic plans;
  • Integrating investigations, communications, and field organizing into compelling campaigns;
  • Negotiating with CEOs and senior leadership in target companies;
  • Conducting advocacy with high-level policymakers and lawmakers for lasting reforms;
  • Working closely with civil society organizations in key countries;
  • Tracking campaign benchmarks;
  • Coordinating with campaign partners; and
  • Advising international philanthropies and donor governments.
  • Fundraising (primarily from large foundations)

Regional and subject-matter expertise are a requirement for this job.

The ability to fluently or proficiently speak French is a major plus.

This position is based in Washington, DC, and is being offered in partnership with Waxman Strategies, a mission-driven consulting firm that supports Mighty Earth’s work.  Significant international travel is part of the job.

Compensation: Competitive and commensurate with experience, and includes a generous benefits package. 

Application Deadline: To apply, please email your resume and cover letter to [email protected] by Monday, April 30th at 5pm.

We are an equal opportunity employer; we strictly prohibit discrimination against any employee or applicant on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, sexual orientation, disability, gender identity or expression and any other characteristic protected by law.


Una nueva investigación revela deforestación, incendios y problemas de salud pública promovidos por la industria europea de la carne

Una Nueva Investigación Revela Deforestación, Incendios y Problemas de Salud Pública Promovidos Por la Industria Europea de la Carne

Lee el informe

Una nueva investigación realizada por Mighty Earth, Rainforest Foundation Norway y Fern revela deforestación a gran escala, incendios y violaciones de los derechos humanos en el Gran Chaco de Argentina y Paraguay vinculados con la industrial mundial de la carne. Las conclusiones se ven documentadas en el informe titulado “La crisis evitable” que se publica hoy. En dicho informe se muestra cómo las grandes empresas de soja y carne están promoviendo de forma innecesaria una deforestación a gran escala para el cultivo de soja, que se transporta luego por todo el mundo para alimentar al ganado.

Europa importa la mayoría de su soja de América Latina; alrededor de 27,9 millones de toneladas de soja y productos de soja en 2016. La soja se envía a procesadores de pienso y carne y se emplea para criar al ganado, por lo tanto para la carne de pollo, cerdo, vacuno, huevos y productos lácteos que se venden en muchos supermercados y restaurantes europeos. Empresas como Carrefour, Lidl, Marks & Spencer y Aldi tienen la responsabilidad de garantizar a los consumidores que no están vendiendo carne ni productos lácteos de animales criados con esta soja.

En nuestra investigación, encontramos vínculos con las empresas estadounidenses de la industria agroalimentaria Cargill y Bunge, dos de las principales que están promoviendo muchas de estas prácticas nocivas. Estas empresas importan grandes cantidades de soja a Europa. En una investigación anterior, documentamos que Cargill y Bunge promovían una deforestación a gran escala para el cultivo de soja en el Cerrado brasileño, así como en la cuenca amazónica boliviana. Estas empresas se han resistido a los intentos de ampliar una producción que no provoque deforestación.

Investigación

Para la investigación, el equipo empleó técnicas de cartografía vía satélite para identificar las áreas de deforestación rápida y continua. Encontraron que áreas extensas del bioma del Gran Chaco estaban siendo taladas y quemadas para la producción de soja. El Gran Chaco es un ecosistema de extraordinaria biodiversidad, donde viven especies autóctonas como el jaguar, el piche llorón o el oso hormiguero gigante, así como comunidades indígenas como los Ayoreo, Chamacoco, Enxet, Guarayo, entre muchos otros.

El equipo de investigación visitó veinte lugares en el Chaco sometidos a la deforestación para el cultivo de soja. Documentó la destrucción con drones, además de realizar entrevistas sobre el terreno a agricultores y a miembros de las comunidades locales. Los investigadores encontraron plantaciones de soja de gran extensión, incendios provocados para acabar con los bosques autóctonos y la vegetación, así como hábitats quemados y desforestados. Aquí se pueden encontrar imágenes y vídeos de la investigación (todas las imágenes están disponibles para descargar y emplear).

“El nivel de destrucción era impresionante. Documentamos excavadoras en acción despejando áreas extensas de bosque virgen y prados, así como enormes incendios que escupían nubes de humo”, comenta Anahita Yousefi, directora de políticas de Mighty Earth. “Aunque el Gran Chaco ha recibido tradicionalmente menos atención que otros biomas, como el Amazonas brasileño, se trata de un ecosistema de vital importancia y no hay ningún motivo para destruirlo”.

Intermediarios ocultos

En la investigación se averiguó que las agroempresas estadounidenses Cargill y Bunge –dos empresas que promueven la deforestación masiva para el cultivo de soja en el Cerrado brasileño y en la cuenca amazónica boliviana como documentamos en una investigación previa– también son importantes compradoras de esta soja. Tanto Cargill como Bunge cuentan con políticas públicas de sostenibilidad. Sin embargo, cuando entramos en contacto con ellas en relación a los resultados de nuestro informe, no fueron capaces de proporcionar nada de información sobre el grado de trazabilidad de su cadena de suministro. Si no cuentan con una trazabilidad suficiente, resulta imposible que estas empresas puedan conocer el origen real de la soja que adquieren. Cargill y Bunge no han introducido mecanismos fiables para garantizar que no están promoviendo estas prácticas nocivas.

“Mientras los comerciantes de soja no adopten medidas inmediatas para poner fin a la deforestación, se convierte en responsabilidad de las empresas del sector cárnico, de las distribución y de los inversores exigir que los comerciantes de soja garanticen una soja que no haya provocado deforestación. Los inversores, como el Norwegian Pension Fund Global (fondo soberano noruego) deben tomar medidas fuertes frente a Bunge, una empresa en su cartera, por su incapacidad reiterada de abordar el problema de la deforestación”, comenta Ida Breckan Claudi, asesora política de Rainforest Foundation Norway.

Impacto humano

Además de la destrucción medioambiental, el equipo encontró un impacto significativo para la salud pública, así como conflictos sociales provocados por esta producción industrial de soja. Muchas de las comunidades que viven cerca de estas plantaciones, incluyendo los pueblos indígenas que dependen totalmente del bosque, han visto cómo las nuevas plantaciones de soja invadían sus tierras y, en muchos casos, han sido expulsadas de la tierra que acogió a sus familias durante generaciones. Además, en estas comunidades se ha experimentado un importante aumento de problemas de salud, como cánceres, defectos congénitos, abortos y otras enfermedades relacionadas con pesticidas y herbicidas fuertes, como el glifosato, que se emplean para cultivar soja, a menudo fumigados por aviones.

“La UE es uno de los importadores principales de productos provenientes de tierras en las que se ha procedido a una deforestación ilegal. Son un desastre para los bosques, para las personas y para el cambio climático. El uso intensivo de pesticidas para esta producción agrícola también está dañando seriamente la salud de las personas. La UE ha regulado sus importaciones de madera y de pescado obtenido de forma ilegal. Ya va siendo hora de que haga lo mismo con los productos agrícolas”, comenta Nicole Polsterer, encargada de la campaña sobre el consumo de Fern.

Una alternativa comprobada

Por último, la destrucción que está teniendo lugar en el Gran Chaco de Argentina y Paraguay es completamente evitable. Hay más de 650 millones de hectáreas de terrenos previamente despejados en toda América Latina, en los que se podría cultivar sin amenazar a los ecosistemas autóctonos. En Brasil, la industria de la soja, incluyendo Cargill y Bunge, implementó la Moratoria de la Soja de Brasil hace más de una década. Con ese sistema, se traslada la nueva producción a terrenos despejados. Ha gozado de gran éxito y prácticamente se ha erradicado la deforestación para el cultivo de soja en el Amazonas brasileño. Desgraciadamente, esta iniciativa se ha visto limitada al Amazonas brasileño, permitiendo que continúe la deforestación a gran escala en Argentina, Paraguay y Bolivia, así como en el Cerrado brasileño.

Mighty Earth, RFN, Fern y una coalición de otras organizaciones instan a las empresas de soja a que extiendan esta iniciativa exitosa para la eliminación de la deforestación a otras regiones de América Latina en las que se cultiva soja, incluyendo el Gran Chaco, así como el Amazonas boliviano y el Cerrado brasileño.